The Richard Heines print collaboration with Dries Van Noten is one of my favourites details about fashion week. Haines has always considered himself an artist, more than the fashion illustrator he has come to be known as. From 2008 his blog What I Saw Today worked as visual diary for the street style and models he witnessed in New York and fashion week around the globe. Because of his signature style it was easy to spot a Richard Heines drawing versus the others that appeared online, people (including me) were desperate to have their own style immortalised. DRIES3

Fashion design is not exactly a departure for Richard, who started out as a designer for Perry Ellis and Calvin Klein. For spring/summer 2015, Dries Van Noten unveiled a gorgeous collection inspired by Richard Nureyev, and the ballet for which the former is famous. Richard very graciously answered a few questions about the collection for Man of the Cloth exclusively below.

driesHow did the Dries collaboration come about? Furthermore, what can you tell us about the conceptualisation process? 

The people from Dries had contacted me originally a few years ago when they began work on the book to correspond with his exhibit at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris. They decided not to go with illustration, and said they would contact me again when a new project surfaced. Then a few months ago they reached out and asked me if I wanted to collaborate on prints for the s/s15 men’s collection – of course I was thrilled. Dries and I met once when he was here in New York and he shared the initial concept, then I spent a week in Antwerp working with him and his team and we really got down to the details of the collection. It was a wonderful process working with him and his team, and I think the results speak for themselves.

Menswear has certainly broken its boundaries over the past few years. Where do you see it going next, especially with print and colour being major players right now.

Whoa, that’s a big question. Menswear is changing and evolving as men change and evolve and their habits of shopping change with them. I think with the Internet men have learned to be more creative about  how to put themselves together, how to be creative, and how powerful the art of dressing is. I don’t see that reversing any time soon.
Any plans to collaborate on this level in the future?
I’m super discreet and never reveal the work I’m doing until the people I’m working with want it released. So, I never kiss and tell…
Images from Richard Haines and WWD.com